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of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
do the reverse? >> what i say is that generally in the environment we're in thou, we're seeing a pick up in u.s. growth, pick up in chinese growth. we're starting to see a pick up in demand for key industrial commodities. i think at this point you're starting to see investors shift away from the cyclical commodities such as gold. >> it's shifting away from the nor defensive types of assets and even more in the commodities space moving more to the industrials. >> paladium, platinum up at seven-month highs. what is behind that? >> we're starting to see a pick up in growth in china and the u.s. the world's two largest economies. also you're seeing issues on the copper. there are a lot of problems in terms of getting these medals out of the ground. for platinum, 80% of it is produced in south africa. when you have labor issues, it has a big impact on supply. on the palladium side, we have the russian state slowing down substantially. it's stockpiled sales. you're seeing a squeeze -- >> supply side issues, as well. >> absolutely. and you're seeing a pick up in demand. that's been driving p
emotional? > > i think it is emotional because we grew up in an environment where most people didn't talk about money comfortably. second, it is an intersection between what you think and what you feel, and so there is this whole value confusion that occurs, and it always feels personal when somebody says you spend too much money or you don't know how to enjoy life. it feels very personal, and so knowing how to distance the emotions from the decision making is really important, or you will repeat this pattern of making the same mistakes over and over again. > what is the best way to bring up the topic of money in spending? > > the first is to do it in a non-charged environment. so what we would tell people is, have a scheduled time to do it. i meet with my wife of 20 years every week, but for most people once a month or once a quarter would be enough. second, make sure that you understand the other person's money mind, so that when you approach a sensitive area, you do it in their language. third, use a checklist. we have a check list - it's totally free - for individuals as well as for c
troublesome bills of sale. the british environment secretary said the problem was not simply one of public health. >> i think what we got involved in this horse issue is criminal activity which appears to cross borders. that is an entirely separate matter. >> the european commission has announced plans to institute brandon dna testing of beef products starting in march. in addition, authorities are testing the product across the continent for the equine painkiller, though they say eating horse meat containing it should be little threat to human health. our correspondent, joining us from our parliamentary to you. we have politicians across is that going to be enough to clear this up? th>> these tests should certainy go some way in making consumers feel more confident about the meat products they are buying throughout the european union. ironically, two weeks ago, the british food safety association started testing for chemicals in horse meat sparked by this mixup of beef and horse meat scandal and promptly found traces of chemicals, including those mentioned in the report, which was typical
of opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to, you know, the financial regulators, dodd frank, business today faces a different regulatory environment than the past couple of decades, no? >> i don't think so. i remember early on acquisitions we were going to make t at at&t, it was tough. we didn't know. we spent a great deal of time in the political part of the business and the regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it's changed so much. >> i see. okay. what about the global story? a lot of people say in the last several decades american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today, you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalor, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. i think there are some coming back. i think that's a good observation and i think that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization sort of openness that we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bringing jobs back
. risks will come down. but we're still in an environment where you need to focus on the risks out there. >> i don't think that's anytime soon. >> and that will be very important. >> i think investors need to focus on that down the road. for now, it's not going to be a factor pore probably most of the year, we would think. >> and i guess a little surprising is the economy feels like it's starting to turn. if you look at housing, if you look at what we hear from a lot of ceos about what's happening at this very moment, they feel okay with that. it's just when you ask them to give you guidance for the next quarter or the next year, they say they can't see that far. >> and i think it comes down to having things like the ee quester. certainly a reconciliation after the fact that the u.s. is spending so much more than it brings in. i think one of the interesting things, just around rates, bullard yesterday, for example, said that he expects 3% real growth this year. so 3% real growth and 2% inflation, that gets me to march like a 5% ten-year. we're nowhere close to that. lloyd blankfein was o
in the future saying this is a low growth environment. the new norm. as a result, they are all competing for the same market share, which typically, leads to pricing pressure. there's not a bigger pie growing. it's, rather, how do we slice up the pie today. >> spreeing to hear in light of the fact that the stock market is back to historic highs, but that's driven by profits of companies saying they may not have the leverage any longer. interesting to see they feel slower growth in the brick countries, but hope coming from beyond that. >> yeah, uh-huh. this year, the brick countries historically slowed down a little. you have optimism from china in the last six months, but they are moving into the next generation being a malaysia, indonesia, africa, turkey, and the like. corporates focus on that rise in consumer for opportunities to diversify the revenue stream and go after the growth. >> fascinating. look at the consumer at home and what's going on here and holding back, they are worried about the impact of higher taxes on the consumer. 77% of the american population saw the paycheck shr
in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
. the official consensus is this is not a health scare but labelling scheme. in britain, the environment minister said all is being done to identify those responsible. >> i made it absolutely clear that should there be material which represents a serious threat to human health and emerging from the tests emerging over the next few days,, i will not hesitate to take the necessary action. i will work with the european commission and european authority but we are not in a position to unilaterally and arbitrarily ban a product in the rules of the single market. >> they are trying to establish how and when the horse was relabeled as before being delivered to the luxembourg processing plant. french officials are looking at a supply chain which begins in romania at an abattoir where they slaughter both beef cattle and horses. from there it is but a dutch trader acquired the meat and it was then sold to another trader, this time in cyprus. next, it was sold to its french company which sold -- which sold to the luxembourg plan. tests on ready-made bows and yet -- lasagna and the u.k. revealed it was 100%
in volume is really a natural occurrence in this environment. > you are just back from china. what did you find there? > > lots of pollution. i was in beijing for two days. i have been in china numerous times, and this was by far the worst i've ever seen it. but, aside from that, you look at the economy, things are moving. it is bouncing right along, and they are rebalancing the economy. you can see the service sector, the financial sector, different things moving. so i think in general things are moving in china. there is still a lot to be done and a lot of reform to be done, not the least of which is clean air and clean water. but i think these are things, initiatives to look forward to, and other than that, i think china is moving as expected, if not better. > we will take out our pollution put there tim. and what about the united states? what worries you about the market here? > > you know, not a lot worries me right now in this market. it is liquidity-driven. the fed is buying 80% of the treasury, which is unbelievable. i never thought i'd see that. so i think as long as that occurs,
environment to persist in 2013. >> reporter: a stronger euro makes imports of u.s. goods cheaper, and that could give some u.s. companies a boost in european sales. >> they'll get the most benefit from taking those euros that they earn abroad in europe and bringing them back home to the united states, where the currency has now become a little bit weaker. it'll have a little bit of a tailwind to their profits. >> reporter: much of the money printing in the u.s. and japan will likely pour into developing economies as investors hunt for bigger returns, but it could also inflate the currencies of those countries and create an asset bubble. >> the more monetary easing we see in the major economies, the more we are going to see a move towards interventionism and capital controls in the emerging economies. >> reporter: analysts say, come the g-20 meeting this weekend in moscow, any talk of a currency war will likely take place behind closed doors and away from the scrutiny of currency watchers. ruben ramirez, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: those tensions over foreign currencies will be
and the environment and touched on in the inaugural address and starting wednesday the president will hit the road, takes the message to residents of north carolina, georgia and north carolina. our next guest was a speechwriter for president clinton. including four state of the union addresses. michael waldman is executive director of the brennan center for justice at nyu. welcome. >> great to be with you. >> what's the strategy behind a more aggressive maybe antagonist kind of message that we might hear tomorrow night? >> well, one of the things is that it seems to be working. i think that his inaugural address, for example, was to me the best speech he's given as president. it didn't have some of the drabness and caution of some of his earlier speeches. it said something. and so, i think that if he keeps going with that approach of boldness and ambition it is not that everything he says is enacted in to law but he'll be able to make a case to the country and with some vivid colors and strong arguments. >> and the country wants to hear a lot about jobs which was relatively unmentioned in the inau
council to deal with emergencies more effectively. >> translator: i want to create an environment where we can properly discuss diplomatic and national security issues on a daily basis from a strategic viewpoint. that will enable us to deal with matters more swiftly and with stronger political leadership. >> abe was speaking friday with members of the council. they will discuss how they should gather and analyze intelligence. >>> a major japanese drugmaker will launch an enterprise that will develop a drug for hard to cure muscular dystrophy. it will receive money from a state backed organization and a private sector venture capital fund. executive executives said the innovation network corporation of japan will invest a total of $17 million in the new entity. the firm is to be launched next month. the executives say they'll develop a drug together with researcheses from kobi institution and other institutions. they aim to put a drug on the market by 2020. muscular dystrophy is one example of a disease that gradually weakens the muscles. the use of government money will attract attention t
representatives of local governments and the environment industry in tokyo met to set up a task force, planning to share information on the problem and discuss preventive measures. ministry officials said they need more observation points to detect minute pollutants called pm 2.5. they are found in exhaust and factory smoke. the ministry is drawing up guidelines on protecting people's health if the density of pm 2.5 rises. >> translator: it's close to china. people there are increasingly concerned about the issue. we want the central government to discuss the matter and clearly show us the results as soon as possible. >> authorities in tokyo and osaka have started to provide pollution data online. >>> naval officers from mainly asian pacific countries have gathered in japan to discuss security it is aimed at promoting mutual understanding in the region. on monday 15 officers took part in an opening ceremony at japan's maritime staff college in tokyo. they represent 15 countries, including japan, the u.s., south korea, china, and australia. the director of the college's research department says
that authorities can find out if it has harmed the environment. >> north korea is so poor. if the situation becomes worse, this city will be flooded with north korean refugees. >> the un security council has condemned the north korean nuclear attacks and said that they will take further action, but if new sanctions are to be introduced, they will have to employ china as the main backer. beijing will want to send a tough message to pyongyang, that this type of behavior will not be tolerated. and if the sanctions and not tough enough, they may get away with this nuclear attack. but if the sanctions are too harsh, north korea may lash out again. >> martin patients on the border between north korea and china. magazine editors have defended their decision to publish those of the duchess of cambridge on a private holiday. the royal family says the pictures are an invasion of privacy. six months ago the same italian government magazine published photos of the duchess on holiday in france. we are joined now by the australian women's day magazine, planning to publish the photos on monday. nick, what does th
. however environment minister has expressed some concerns. he says that building new thermal power plants or expanding existing ones will just push up greenhouse gas emissions. >>> the japanese government plans to give financial aid to businesses that are developing shell gas and other low cost energy resource. industry minister says the government is considering offering debt guarantees for such companies. >> translator: rising fuel costs account for half of japan's growing trade deficit. it's an urgent task for our country's economy to cut them down. >> he says natural gas is p produced in various countries. the cost of natural gas imports can also be reduced. >>> all right that is going wrap it up for the week in biz. here's the markets now. >>> the repercussions from the hostage crisis in algeria last month continue to be felt around the world. and nowhere is that more true than in japan. of the 39 foreigners who died ten were japanese nationals. their deaths have caused much sorrow and anger in japan and also serving as an inspiration to some people. we have more. >> reporter: he is
intense competitive environment. the name of the new carrier expected to be american airlines. >>> all right. that's going to do it for biz this hour. we'll see what's going on with the markets. >>> a people tested by politics and history. innovators whose technology spread about the world. artists who captured the imagination of audiences everywhere. these are the faces of south korea. nhk world updates you on what's happening across the peninsula wednesday and thursday here on "newsline." >>> in south korea men over the age of 19 must serve two years in the military. famous actors and singers are no exception. recently several korean stars now doing their required military service performed in a musical that turned out to be a big hit. ♪ >> reporter: the promise had a ten-day run in seoul. it's about the korean war started when north korea attacked the south in 1950. many actors and singers in this military musical actually serve on active duty right now. yunok, for example, led the k-pop group before he was drafted. service members like him are called entertainment soldiers. seven
with that. now is a great time for opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to the financial regulators, dodd-frank, basel. business faces a different situation than decades ago. >> i don't think so. i remember acquisitions with at&t we didn't know. it was tough. we spent a great deal of time in the political and regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it change sod much. >> okay. what about the global story? people say in the last several decades, you know, american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalore, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. there are some coming back. that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization openness we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bring jobs back to this country and rethink that. that's helpful. >> final question. what do you drive? you driving a gm? >> i am driving a gtm cadillac
are not generally willing to pay for access to content. in a digital environment. they are interesting -- they are interested in supporting brands. i think they are interested and still willing to pay for experience. experiences are different than access. to be a little bit more precise about this, the old model used to be you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print. for a very long time, until the web and all the business models were disrupted. now, our model is you give us $35 and you get print but you also get our experiential products. it did -- the digital colom is all the things i was talking about before. unlimited access, commenting, several things in that list. you get access to subscriber- only events, which we are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting
our ability to grow our economy and provide an environment where all americans have the opportunity to lead healthy, safe and productive life. that's what brings us together here today, because sequestration is about more than numbers on a ledger. they are real people behind these numbers and their lives and livelihoods are on the line. these cuts have consequences, and every american will pay the price. with fewer food inspectors will be more susceptible to foodborne illness. will be a greater risk of deadly disease outbreak as public health laboratory schools. with fewer air traffic controllers, flights will be curtailed. classroom size will increase as teachers are laid off. national parks will close. we will be less safe with fewer police on the streets, and we will wait longer to cure debilitating diseases like cancer and alzheimer's. today, ndd united is sentiments of congress and the white house a 72 page letter signed by 3200 national, state and local organizations, including those represented here today, to stop the political brinkmanship come to stop cutting for cutting sa
. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefly comment on somethin
on retirement, security, the environment, homeland security, minority health and health disparities and he is been a consist president supporter of the national institute of health and our mission and the work we do. he was elected to the senate in 2006 where he currently serves on the finances, public relations and business committees. he serves as co-chair on the security commission in europe. prior to this he represented mary mayor's third congressional district in the house of representatives. and before that in the maryland house of delegates where he served from 1967 to 1978. he was speaker. >> he is a champion for medical research support for maryland's world class university hopkins university of maryland and several others. and he is a strong supporter of our state's biotech industry which is not located here by chance. he's also been i think a strong supporter throughout all of this as the importance of looking for curious for many diseases and protect our citizens from bioattacks. >> he's been here in a town meeting. we arrive here today at a particularly interesting moment give
of domestic investors that usually have less demand to increase interest rates for the environment suggest so. >> okay. marco -- >> so at the end of the day, i don't see increase of interest expense drastic for japan in the medium term. >> right, right. well, that's the worry to some extent. but anyway, marco bardelli joining us from singapore. >>> meanwhile, the bank of hong kong did keep its benchmark rate steady overnight. still, suggestions about concerns over stimulus policies gives us some surprise. chery, what exactly did the bank of korea say about japan? >> although the bank of korea governor did not name japan and tried to stay diplomatic in the press conference today, he did say there are down side risks to the korean economy like a possible fiscal tightening by many countries and the issue of a foreign exchange rate. japan's aggressive monetary easing drive can take toll on korea's exports as they account for about half of the economy. and this on top of the recently weaker yen and the strengthening yuan that has hurt investor sentiment here on the kospi, particularly in the auto
places to be safer. in the short term, we can just decide to live in more urban environments. a wonderful study, you know, dick jackson famously asked the question in what sort of environment are you most likely to die in a pool of blood? that's how he puts it to his audiences. [laughter] and they compared murder by strangers, crime, to car crashes and added the two together. they looked at portland, vancouver and seattle in all three places, you were 15% safer in the grittiest inner city than the leafy suburbs because of the connell by nation of the two. -- combination of the two. and then finally asthma. who talk abouts about asthma? fourteen americans die every day from asthma. okay, that doesn't sound like a huge amount. it's three times the rate of the '90s and it's entirely due to motor exhaust. the sickest places in america are those places which are the most car dependent. and, you know, in phoenix you've got four months out of the year that healthy people are not supposed to leave their houses because of the amount of driving that's going on. so, again, what's the solution? the c
, that it's special on the central bank to bring about an environment of price stability ask put the government on the central bank. understand that you need fiscal consolidation, you need price stability for long-term sustainable growth. there is, of course, difference of view in the short-term, a difference of perception depending on where you're sitting. but i don't think you should see that as a major division. international quart nation or at least a shared understanding on the implications of individual country policies, especially systemically important countries, domestic policies, lower impact on emerging economies. and i believe that advanced economies, systemically important economies must be sensitive to the lower impact of their policies. >> also speaking on the sidelines of the g-20, australia's deputy prime minister dismissed talk of a currency war, but did admit that a stopping aussie/dollar is a concern and key to australia's economy. >> we saw a huge crash in commodity prices in the second half of last year and that relied heavily on our revenues. and part and p
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> it will be cooler today. cold front on the way for tomorrow. i mine, it will get much, much colder on tuesday. more on that coming up in about five minutes. >>> 7:13. firefighters are still working to contain a large fire burning at a metal recycling center in tampa, florida. they are using both water and foam to try and control the flames. within the past 30 minutes we learned that two diesel tanks are filled with not ammonia but calcium nitrate. they say that chemical is less reactive but still dangerous. >>> a state lawmaker says the state may be pushing too hard to recover money from feel who start wildfires. the sacramento "bee" reports for the past eight years, california has aggressively pursued individuals and businesses who start fires. that money is used to cover the costs of fig
to believe them. melissa: how do you pick your bets in this environment? do you buy the index? do you buy etf? do you buy real estate? >> i like etf's. you know that. the symbol is rfp. it says if it is a broadening, rising market, you want to get into the goal weight etf's. you want to get the equal movement. melissa: david kotok, thank you so much for coming on. lori: senate democrats are offering an alternative plan. republicans already saying it does not stand a chance. here is rich and sends in washington with the latest. rich: congress settle taxes earlier this year. they are offering a minimum 30% effective tax rate for income for more than a million dollars. cutting spending on the military that appears to drop anyway. ending direct farm subsidies. the white house approves saying republicans in congress face a simple choice. do they protect investments and health care or do they continue to prioritize and protect tax loopholes that benefit the very few? republicans are waiting for the senate to vote first. >> when the senate passes a plan, we will be happy to take a look at it. until
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
what it is like to be a policy maker trying to do different things in a partisan environment that have come to make the case why the fiscal challenges are so pressing. it is still import we were to come with a comprehensive plan to address them. campaign to fix the debt has been around for not very long but has amassed a tremendous group of support. from citizens across the country where we have 350,000 citizens to have joined the campaign, a present in 50 states, active organizations in 23 states in growing, partnerships with 205,000 small businesses. , and organizations all coming together in a way the country has to to explain why making tough choices of putting in place the policies that were required to get a hold of our nation's fiscal challenges is so important. i am proud to be joined by this tremendous group of former members of congress. i am going to turn it over to one of our three cochairs. do you have senator judd gregg and a few other people representing this new council. thank you very much. >> it is a pleasure to be here was so many of my former colleagues to serve thi
of the city, which was fountain square and environs. >> infrastructure. >> we had an infrastructure strategy. develop the banks, which is the river front. and begin to redevelop -- >> not your banks. the banks of the river. >> i was on board. >> the banks of the river. not the other banks. to your point, at the local level, a group came together, it was clearly in all of the stakeholders -- >> and that's a lot better than going to the federal government begging for that money and then the rest of the 49 states pay for it. >> it's all about leadership. if somebody has the courage, you know, to make a declaration about what winning might be, i think you'd be surprised at the number of americans that would stand up and stand behind it. >> so, a year ago, we'll just, you know, you did run. &g, we'd be remiss. >> three years ago. >> right. but a year ago, i looked at your successor and he was, i mean, there were -- did you make barbarians at the gate? who did you say made that up? >> eddie -- >> but he did and you got in trouble for saying it. anyway, for whatever reasons, mcdonald's was under as
really structural changes in the health care environment. and we'll see where they end up. >> rose: and washington is not dealing with the issue. >> no, not candidly not well. >> rose: can't get beyond-- you know-- recently it was able to extend the meddle-- middle class tax cuts and not, tend the tax cuts for people who made $250,000 household income. >> and good but not responsive to the issue, right. the issue of whether tax rate was go up on wealthy is an interesting one. it's certainly politically charged. but it contributes over ot ten year period round number 6 to 700 billion. barely touches the issue. and so the issue didn't become how do we deal with this intermediate term crisis, it's not long term any more i believe it's intermediate term, it's how do we deal with this fiscal cliff of the moment. >> rose: and even newt gingrich said it is not the place republicans ought to make the fight because in the end they will do something. but if it doesn't happen, then people like you and others will descend on washington to force some result which will not be-- you know in the e
that kate middleton needs to reware outfits baas it helps the environment. but some say he's picking on the wrong woman. >> can i just say your accent sound like dick van dyke. you can't do english accents anymore. >> neil: people don't know you're from the bronx. >> this is sour grapes. came up with punk, but at the same time -- >> neil: punk fashion? >> yes, but she got rejected by cate kate middleton in 2001 -- >> neil: so she has a judge. is mean to kate middleton she gets a lot of press. and she is introducing a knew new fashion -- neil theme other do we have a picture? >> she is a big -- >> and cate middleton wears many top designers, however she doesn't wear her. this is where you're getting comments from dame vivian about indicate middle don. when she gave the interview she was wearing a t-shirt that said, i am julian a swung. she is claiming that indicate -- kate middleton should not reware her outfits, but because it's good for the environment to rewear your clothes. kate middleton is among the most photographed women in the world, not unlike princess diana. >> i don't have
it can be an issue because it can cause an artificial barrier and can hurt the jobs environment. we would recommend that the administration focus on creating jobs. that will create demand for people and that will create a natural wage increase. look, the reality most markets minimum wage is irrelevant. you're paying people well above that. but it is a scenario we think the focus should be on job creation first and you will get demand for folks and that will raise wages for folks. liz: talk about expansions plans here in the u.s. and europe. you're building up all kinds of properties including a couple here in new york and these are high-end or upper scale hotels, correct? >> higher scale. liz: you only do that when you believe an economy is coming back. >> we do. barring something unforeseen that will set us going backwards from washington which we do not think we will we get, we think the hotel business will be in sight for a stronger run. not a lot of hotels coming on for 14 or 15. that should be a four or five-year good run. we'll start with the wind at your back. we hope for great thi
for the environment schemes that they put in place. let me deal with each of those points. the section of the budget that includes spending on research, innovation and university funding is up by over a third. the money is handed out on the basis of quality, so britain's universities are particularly well placed to benefit. we have ensured that structural funds will continue to flow to our less well-off regions, and britain's share will remain broadly the same, at around 11 billion. while we have cut spending on the common agricultural policy overall, we have protected the flexibility that will allow us to direct funds to support both the environment and the livelihoods of our farming communities. overall, this is a better-framed budget in terms of growth, jobs and competitiveness. it is disappointing that administrative costs are still around 6% of the total, but overall spending on the cap will fall by 13% compared with the last seven-year budget. research and development, and other pro-growth investment, will now account for 13% rather than 9% of the total budget. reform of eu spending is a long-
's a lot of money. you have to put it somewhere. >> if you're going to wait for the political environment to get better, you're going to be an old man. >> you can't wait for washington. get on with running your business. it's filibustering over hagel adds more fuel to the fire. >> yeah. >> so you just have to get on running your business. we haven't seen any change in climate behavior. also there's a better mood, we have not seen that translate into significant change for climate behavior. we think 2013 will be similar to 2012 because we did have the olympics and the presidential election. which you remember. >> i remember. >> you remember the results closely. it will be similar to 2013. digital will be strong. data, technology will be strong. but same general tone. so we don't see the real world having changed at all, really. >> there's one other -- oh, okay, we're going to go to the weather. but berkshire in adm. >> berk share made some new moves. you have new people making investment decisions there, too, todd and ted. but as for berkshire hathaway, it did take a new state and aerch mi
be potentially serious problem. you have to realize this is a captive audience. this is a closed environment. and many things could potentially go wrong. in general, carnival and all the other cruise lines are very good about dealing with these situations. >> i know you're a doctor and not an attorney, but i'm wondering if the illnesses that came as a result are real enough to where any kind of lawsuits would have a standing chance in court? >> again, i'm definitely not an attorney, but in general, there's a possibility that they could prove a case. anyone that flies or drives or gets in a ship knows there are a risks to that. this is kind of an unusual situation, but i would say the litigation would be handled appropriately. >> doctor, while the passengers may have gotten off the ship, are there any sort of lingering concerns out there? could there be illnesses or injuries that develop after they've left the ship? >> that's a great question. potentially, i would be careful to look for bacterial infections, diarrhea. people could be very stressed about this afterwards. post-traumatic stress
constrained environment. these challenges combined with a destabilizing impact such terrorist and criminal networks on a general rodriquez's tosk at africom among the most complicated in the department. an additional matter in the africom aor the committee watches closely as the ongoing support of u.s. operations in central africa to assist the multinational effort to remove joseph coney and top lieutenants in the battlefield. this committee and general inhofe has been very active in this effort and has sought to ensure the mission is adequate resource including additional intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. general rodriquez, i know that you are familiar with this mission and the committee looks forward to hearing from you about it and working with you on that and so many of the other challenges that you will be facing. i am going to turn the gavel over to senator kain has agreed to take over because i must close to the floor and i will call on senator inhofe. >> thank you mr. chair and i join you in welcoming the witnesses. i've had an opportunity to get to know th
ott, tom created an environment built around using serious and objective and economical analysis to inform that indications policymaking functions at a critical time in american history took place. a junction where we would continue the communications and embrace our more traditional reliance on open entry in the competitive free enterprise system. at that important juncture, it was a division that lend themselves to technical and economic analyses, if you will. in the case of open skies, there were enough parking spaces to accommodate competitive entry also. they were not enough parking spot, but likewise committee argued that the propelling economies or scale for natural monopoly characteristics associated with the network and it would make competitive entry inefficient or unwise from a public policy perspective. a similar question and other crucial areas, such as the innovations market and the satellite mobile radio field, as i would look around the audience, i see so many people that were involved and played key roles in these studies and these issues. the contribution was no
more sustainability to look at the environment. now we have to learn, and that is quite a challenge for progressive politics that this is no longer working. and it's even no longer working when we were in power. and i'm a social democrat, and if you look at the years when we were in power, everyone is now single kid, we work economically very successful in those days because competitiveness of the german economy grew, but on the other hand, you have to admit the following. there are no better incomes, there are no better jobs, there's no better wealth of state and more social security. and this of course means that we have to rethink a couple of questions, and these are to my mind on the agenda. and i will make a quote of michael sandal for made the book these days, a book with a tough, what money can buy. and i give you two citations, to quote that are in the book come to my mind, arthur edward the first quote is the following. the most fateful change that unfolded during the past decade was not an increase in greed, it was the expansion of markets and have market values into areas
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